How to join the ends of a tablet woven band (almost) invisibly

This technique will be especially useful if you want to use a tablet woven band as a trim for cuffs or neckline. It allows you to cover loose threads and avoid unexpected unfolding. The idea is simple: you need to leave about 5 cm of threads on one side of …

June – Birka motif with a Slavic vibe

This band is unusual in the sense that in between the repeated motifs there are some floating threads left. This is done so to achieve green only space which nicely highlights the pattern. For those interested in how to weave a one colour surface without floating threads, I recommend the …

A 13th century band from Stary Brzesc (Poland)

While in Poland, I took the opportunity to visit the Archeological and Ethnographic Museum in Lodz (Central Poland). I wanted to see one particular object – a woven piece of fabric found in Stary Brzesc and dated to the 13th century. I had seen some replicas of it online which …

March – red, blue, white ‘Slavic’ belt

Although the so called ‘pan-Slavic’ colours – red, white, and blue – were introduced only in the 19th century, they were rather common and widely worn colours in the Middle Ages. Red dye was obtained from dried madder root, while blue from dried leaves of woad and later, indigo. The …

February – Tablet woven band from 14th century Germany

Tablet weaving is mainly a domain of Viking Age enthusiasts. When I was involved in the late Middle Ages reenactment we hardly knew this craft. This is because in the second half of the Middle Ages (let’s say from the 12th century onwards) tablet weaving was gradually losing its importance …

Show your tablets some love the medieval way

I just received a new set of weaving tablets from a local artisan and I thought this is a great occasion to talk about how to take care of your wooden weaving equipment. This is important especially for those who weave outside and in different weather conditions. I often weave …